WAEC LITERATURE IN ENGLISH ANSWERS 2021

WAEC LITERATURE IN ENGLISH ANSWERS 2021

Here is the waec literature in English answers for 2021. We will post the answers for the waec literature in English.

Literature-Obj:

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PROSE-ANSWERS (You Are To Answer Only Two(2) Only.

(2)
Adah’s story begins when she is about eight years old, when she develops a dream to go to the United Kingdom. (Though she does not know her exact age, she does know that she “fe[els] eight” and was born during World War II.) As a Nigerian girl, however, she must overcome limitations placed upon her gender. She fights to be sent to school, as education is seen as unnecessary for girls. Adah takes it upon herself to go to school one day; thereafter, she is allowed to attend school with her younger brother, Boy, at an expensive private institution. In other words She is permitted to continue to pursue an education so that her family can charge a higher “bride-price.” Adah wins a scholarship for high school that includes room and board, so she moves out of her uncle’s house. Soon, though she wishes to continue studying. She decides she will have to marry. Her mother and others in the community have been encouraging Adah to consider suitors for some time already, but Adah did not want to marry a much older man. She ultimately marries Francis Obi, a young man who is studying accounting and cannot afford her bride-price. Adah lives with Francis and his parents, with whom she gets along well. She starts a good job at the American Consulate but is dismayed to discover that she will be the only one working to support the family. She quickly becomes pregnant with her first two children: a daughter, Titi, and a son, Vicky. While Adah is pregnant for the second time, a plan is conceived for Francis to study in England; Adah has shared her dream with Francis and he finally agrees that they can pursue it.

WAEC 2021 – LITERATURE PROSE

(7)

Setting can be defined as the physical or social environment within the character in a work of prose operate. Setting is also the location and time frame in which the action of a narrative takes place. The setting is the backbone for a novel it sets the tone and gives the reader a mental image of the time and places the story takes place. The Wuthering Heights Estate in Emily Bronte’s novel “Wuthering Heights” is one of the most important settings in the story.

The spatial setting of the story straddles three important places, namely Wuthering Heights, Thrushcross Grange and the moors in between. Each of these places is important for different reasons. The two families the story centres around live in these houses, and the houses are symbolic in different ways. Wuthering Heights, as the word wuthering suggests, represents a world that is withered of humanity, a world of darkness in the figurative sense; while the Grange directly suggests a land being farmed, with its implication of fecundity. The Heights does not only experience wild wind and cold weather, its inhabitants are also people with a wild streak, generally cold and crude. Like a typical gothic setting, Wuthering Heights, from the beginning of the novel, is presented as a dark and ominous building. ancient and isolated, all of which foreshadow the gloomy atmosphere that dominates the novel, especially the events that take place there.

On the other hand, the Grange is peopled by a refined gentleman, a gentlewoman and their waited-on-children. The house is well furnished, the weather there more clement, and almost everything about the house in an ideal state. It is also closer to town and its inhabitants are more conscious of social manners as well as morals. The moors separating the two houses signify barrenness, wildness, coldness, and wilderness where people get lost easily; yet, it is a place of attraction to wild spirits such as those of Heathcliff and Catherine. In temporal terms, the story is set in the late 18th century England. Although the period preceding this time was already characterized by class stratification in England, social mobility through marriage gained currency in the 18th century following the emergence of the middle class that came to bridge the gulf between the aristocracy and the working class.

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*section A*

1

In the book Second Class Citizen, Emecheta Buchi uses gender and sexuality to express the many ways in which society treated women and the obstacles that they had to overcome. Buchi uses this book and the many issues discussed throughout the book as a tool in the argument of gender and sexuality as a social construct; however, the ways of the world and the views of society do not see how the way women were treated back then as anything but normal. Adah, the main character of the book is a child who wants a Western education but is denied the opportunity to get one because the mere fact that she is a girl and the privilege of school goes to the boys of the family even though she is the one that wants the education. The theme that is openly used throughout the book is one of vehement animosity of gender discrimination that is often found in the culture of Adah’s people. Buchi portrays the way that African women are discriminated and victimized by the men and older women in their lives.

Emecheta’s novel, Second Class Citizen, opens up with Adah already being discriminated against by her family and the readers know this because in the opening paragraphs Adah is states that, “She was a girl who arrived when everyone was expecting and predicting a boy, so since she was such a disappointment to her tribe, nobody thought of recording her birth she was so insignificant”

*LITERATURE NUMBER 5

As her name suggests, Mary Rambo is both Mary, the saintly mother of Jesus, and Aunt Jemima, the female version of Sambo. Mary is a strong black woman who has learned to survive the violence and corruption of the city by relying on her inner resources. A Southern woman who now lives in the North, Mary provides the narrator’s only source of love and comfort.

After his harrowing experience at the Liberty Paint Factory Hospital, the narrator is grateful for Mary’s kindness and generosity. Seeing him simply as a fellow human being who needs help, Mary takes him into her home, cooks for him, and nurses him back to health. When he can’t pay his rent, she tells him not to worry. Seeing how depressed he is about his situation, Mary encourages him and reassures him that he will make something of himself and be “a credit to his race.” She does everything she can to demonstrate her faith in him and, in effect, adopts him as her surrogate son.

During this time, the narrator sees Mary as the saintly mother figure, referring to her as his anchor and guide, and appreciating her support and generosity. But after he meets Brother Jack and begins to work for the Brotherhood, he sees Mary through different eyes. She becomes a source of shame and embarrassment for him, prompting him to try to shatter her image, as symbolized by his futile attempt to discard the cast-iron bank. The bank, like Mary, represents a part of his heritage he wants to forget. Although he initially appreciates her cooking, he now complains of his steady diet of cabbage. At first he sees her home as a sanctuary and source of solace and comfort, but later he notices the noise, poverty, and filth surrounding her, as indicated by the banging on the pipes, the smell of cabbage, and the invasion of roaches.

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He finally leaves Mary without even saying goodbye, confident that she will survive, having undoubtedly gone through similar experiences with other black men.

Mary is a survivor who represents the courage and dignity of the black woman. Although she is not based on any specific historical character, she is a woman in the tradition of Harriet Tubman, Sojourner Truth, or Mary McCloud Bethune.

Q6.

One of the most memorable characters in the novel, Ras the Exhorter (later called Ras the Destroyer) is a powerful figure who seems to embody Ellison’s fears for the future of the civil rights battle in America. Ras’s name, which literally means “Prince” in one of the languages of Ethiopia, sounds simultaneously like “race” and “Ra,” the Egyptian sun god. These allusions capture the essence of the character: as a passionate black nationalist, Ras is obsessed with the idea of race; as a magnificently charismatic leader, he has a kind of godlike power in the novel, even if he doesn’t show a deity’s wisdom. Ras’s guiding philosophy, radical at the time the novel was published, states that blacks should cast off oppression and prejudice by destroying the ability of white men to control them. This philosophy leads inevitably to violence, and, as a result, both Ellison and the narrator fear and oppose such notions. Yet, although Ellison objects to the ideology that Ras embodies, he never portrays him as a clear-cut villain. Throughout the novel, the reader witnesses Ras exert a magnetic pull on crowds of black Americans in Harlem. He offers hope and courage to many. By the late 1960s, many black leaders, including Malcolm X, were advocating ideas very similar to those of Ras.

Ras, who is depicted as a West Indian, has reminded many critics of Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican-born black nationalist who was influential in the early 1920s. Like Ras, Garvey was a charismatic racial separatist with a love of flamboyant costumes who advocated black pride and argued against integration with whites. (Garvey even endorsed the Ku Klux Klan for working to keep whites and blacks separate.) However, Ellison consistently denied patterning Ras specifically on Garvey. If any link does exist, it is probably only that Garvey inspired the idea of Ras, not that Ellison attempted to recreate Garvey in Ras.

Q6.

One of the most memorable characters in the novel, Ras the Exhorter (later called Ras the Destroyer) is a powerful figure who seems to embody Ellison’s fears for the future of the civil rights battle in America. Ras’s name, which literally means “Prince” in one of the languages of Ethiopia, sounds simultaneously like “race” and “Ra,” the Egyptian sun god. These allusions capture the essence of the character: as a passionate black nationalist, Ras is obsessed with the idea of race; as a magnificently charismatic leader, he has a kind of godlike power in the novel, even if he doesn’t show a deity’s wisdom. Ras’s guiding philosophy, radical at the time the novel was published, states that blacks should cast off oppression and prejudice by destroying the ability of white men to control them. This philosophy leads inevitably to violence, and, as a result, both Ellison and the narrator fear and oppose such notions. Yet, although Ellison objects to the ideology that Ras embodies, he never portrays him as a clear-cut villain. Throughout the novel, the reader witnesses Ras exert a magnetic pull on crowds of black Americans in Harlem. He offers hope and courage to many. By the late 1960s, many black leaders, including Malcolm X, were advocating ideas very similar to those of Ras.

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Ras, who is depicted as a West Indian, has reminded many critics of Marcus Garvey, a Jamaican-born black nationalist who was influential in the early 1920s. Like Ras, Garvey was a charismatic racial separatist with a love of flamboyant costumes who advocated black pride and argued against integration with whites. (Garvey even endorsed the Ku Klux Klan for working to keep whites and blacks separate.) However, Ellison consistently denied patterning Ras specifically on Garvey. If any link does exist, it is probably only that Garvey inspired the idea of Ras, not that Ellison attempted to recreate Garvey in Ras.

section A

1.Yoko is seen by many of her subjects as a usurper and a friend of the colonial administration; she remained controversial throughout her reign until her death in 1906. In the play, this controversy is packaged as a defiance of the cultural norm that women should not dare rule during war times. Because of her loyalty to her husband and her desire to lead, being somebod Ise’s wife after her husband does not appeal to her. Her insistence at having control of her space and fighting a culture set-up that has no consideration for women as rulers, she has to be tough and insolent to push her agenda through. Being a visionary who willingly gives up the privilege of childbearing for the leading chieftaincy title in all of Kpa-Mende, she is willing to disprove the myth of female inferiority. Kargbo has done a tremendous job of portraying Yoko as an impressive ruler of heroic proportions. Indeed, the historic Yoko was nothing short of the heroic present Yoko as a complex figure whose feminine comportment, sensuality, and beauty promoted her among women, but whose fearless Soul and unrestrained ambition made her a competent and visionary leader among her male counterparts. It is a painful realization for Yoko that all this while she was being used and now she is being humiliated.

section B

2.

The main themes in The Lion and the Jewel are vanity, gender roles, and tradition versus progress.

Vanity: Vanity is Sidi’s downfall, as her belief in her own beauty and superiority causes her to underestimate Baroka, which allows him to take advantage of her.

Gender roles: Ilujinle is a patriarchal community, with Baroka proving his masculinity and power through sexual and physical conquests. When Sidi challenges Baroka’s masculinity, he punishes her and reestablishes the traditional gender hierarchy.

Tradition versus progress: Whereas Lakunle embraces the forces of modernization, characters like Baroka and Sadiku view modernization as a threat to traditional ways of life.

*Section B*

5.

In Look Back in Anger, John Osbourne presents Cliff as Jimmy’s compassionate, easygoing foil and a voice of conscience.

I would argue that Cliff is presented as the antidote to Jimmy. While Jimmy is angry, Cliff is calm. While Jimmy is prone to throwing around verbal abuse, Cliff is a peacemaker. Cliff is warm, humorous and has a loving nature. This creates a stark contrast with Jimmy’s coldness, anger.

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